Four male undergrad students at North Carolina University have developed a new idea designed to help women at clubs and bars avoid taking an unwanted psychedelic trip into a bad experience: color changing nail-polish. undercovercolors

The idea first came to public attention in early June , after Ankesh Madan, Stephen Gray, Tasso Von Windheim, and Tyler Confrey-Maloney, collectively won the Lulu eGames student competition with their Undercover Colors pitch. Although now spreading across the internet, nowhere is it actually explained what they will be using and exactly what drugs it can detect (although Ruhypnol and GHB have been explicitly mentioned).

The creators assure the public us that it works (while also asking for donations), and that it will soon come to market as soon as the prototype is finished being refined. They are running public relations through several social-networking sites, including Facebook. Their website appears to still be under construction, but there are links to contact them.

Although this is an ingenious invention, and a step up from drink coasters that can detect GHB or ketamine (and attracts less attention than battery-powered pd.id) , it is attacking a problem at a symptom level instead of attacking the cause. The root cause is a general lack of respect, or an understanding of it, among a decently sized portion of the population. But since we cannot force anyone to understand something, or to learn, we have to start with celebrating increasingly accessible and practical prevention on the symptoms side of the equation.

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