During the last week, Amnesty International and many human rights organizations have condemned the Brazilian cops for using violence against protesters in many cities in Brazil.

Picture: REUTERS/Alex Almeida

Picture: REUTERS/Alex Almeida

That comes after more than a million Brazilians have gathered in over 100 cities to raise the voice about many issues, especially government corruption, taxes, poor quality services,environmentally destructive mega-projects, and now police brutality during FIFA World Cup.

Associated Press published a video showing a Brazilian police officer firing a gun at anti-World Cup protesters blocking a road that leads to Rio de Janeiro’s Maracana stadium in Sunday, June 15, 2014. Yesterday, June 19th, saw protest then riots in Sao Paolo, accompanied by violent police response.

These protests continue despite the fact that even peaceful protest has been forbidden, and rubber bullets and violence are frequently used against those in violation.

Lately, the protesters have been camping at historic wharf known as Cais José Estelita for almost a month to block a debatable development project known as Novo Recife, and show their angry about the wasteful public spending on creating stadiums for the World Cup while conditions in Brazil’s schools and hospitals are still bad. They requested “FIFA, go back to Switzerland,” referring to international soccer’s governing organization.

After #OcupeEstelita movement earned more traction on social networks; police woke the protesters up and told them they had to pack their belongings and leave, then started to use pepper spray to disperse them.

Essentially every match thus far has been coupled with protests and violent altercations with police forces. With national digniteries and political leaders like Obama visiting, this raises concerns about safety. Unfortunately, the concerns that are causing the protests in the first place remain largely undiscussed. These are primarily the same issues that drove previous mass protests a year ago.

The following photos shows shots from the demonstration and clashes from many places in Brazil:

Picture: CHRISTOPHE SIMON/AFP/Getty Images

Picture: CHRISTOPHE SIMON/AFP/Getty Images

Picture: REUTERS/Alex Almeida

Picture: REUTERS/Alex Almeida

More than 300,000 protesters gathered in the seaside city’s central area in Rio de Janeiro.

Picture: EPA/OLIVER WEIKEN

Picture: EPA/OLIVER WEIKEN

Police protect themselves against stone-throwing by protesters in Belem

Picture: REUTERS/Ney Macondes

Picture: REUTERS/Ney Macondes

Picture: REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Picture: REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Picture: EPA/OLIVER WEIKEN

Picture: EPA/OLIVER WEIKEN

Picture: REUTERS/Luciana Whitaker

Picture: REUTERS/Luciana Whitaker

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Picture: AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano

Police were trying hardly to keep angry protesters from getting close to the Foreign Ministry in Brasilia. The next photo shows a police man fires tear gas at protestors during an anti-government demonstration in Rio de Janeiro

A military police officer fires tear gas at protestors during an anti-government demonstration in Rio de Janeiro

Picture: AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano

 

Protesters trying to help their friend who injured during the clashes with police, Rio de Janeiro

Demonstrators help a man injured in clashes with police during the protest in Rio de Janeiro

Picture: REUTERS/Luciana Whitaker

A protester in front of the National Congress in Brasilia

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Picture: REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

During the demonstrations, protesters raise banners with anti-World Cup slogans asking FIFA to leave Brazil in the host country’s colors of green and yellow. The next photo shows a group of protestors lie on the ground before being searched by police during an anti-government demonstration in Rio de Janeiro.

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Picture: AP Photo/Felipe Dana

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Picture: CHRISTOPHE SIMON/AFP/Getty Images

Taken in Porto Alegre, a woman kneels in front of mounted riot policemen as demonstrators clashed with police

Picture: REUTERS/Gustavo Vara

Picture: REUTERS/Gustavo Vara

A poll was taken before the World Cup started revealing that almost 60% of Brazilians did not want to host World Cup because of the seemingly wasteful spending on new and refurbished stadia.

The middle class is now almost totally out of the streets. The dissatisfaction is still there, but they are scared of the violence and the Black Blocs. Now it’s much more aggressive,” said Armando Castelar Pinheiro, an economist who is coordinator of applied economic research at the Getúlio Vargas Foundation.

Demonstrators in Recife city.

Protesters wearing masks in Recife

Picture: REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Ricardo Sennes, a senior Brazil fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center said that the $11.6 billion the Brazilian government spent preparing for the Cup brought two main challenges to the forefront of public attention.

This Brazilian anger about World Cup spending continues, but demonstrators who have been staged since World Cup began couldn’t draw serious public support, as the wide presence of security forces outside Brazil’s 12 World Cup venues has also helped keep demonstrations under control.